Kenzo Takada, First Japanese Designer To Conquer Paris Fashion, Dies Aged 81

Japan’s most famous fashion designer Kenzo Takada, founder of the global Kenzo brand, died in the French capital on Sunday aged 81 after contracting coronavirus.

Tributes have poured in for Takada, the first Japanese designer to decamp to Paris and known especially for his signature floral prints.

“Today, his optimism, zest for life and generosity continue to be pillars of our Maison (House). He will be greatly missed and always remembered,” the Kenzo fashion house he founded wrote on Twitter.

Kenzo Takada founded his fashion house in 1970 and took Paris by storm Kenzo Takada founded his fashion house in 1970 and took Paris by storm Photo: AFP / JOEL SAGET

 

He “helped to write a new page in fashion, at the confluence of the East and the West”, said Ralph Toledano of the Haute Couture Federation.

His death comes 50 years after he launched his first collection in Paris, which he adopted as his home. “Every wall, every sky and every passer-by

Read More

Fashion Designer Kenzo Takada Dies of COVID-19 at 81

Kenzo Takada, fashion designer and founder of the brand Kenzo, has died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, from COVID-19. He was 81.

Takada’s death was confirmed Sunday morning by a post on the Kenzo brand Facebook page.

“For half a century, Mr. Takada has been an emblematic personality in the fashion industry – always infusing creativity and color into the world,” the post reads. “Today, his optimism, zest for life and generosity continue to be pillars of our Maison. He will be greatly missed and always remembered.”

Kenzo’s creative director, Felipe Oliveira Baptista, also remembered Takada with an Instagram tribute, writing “His amazing energy, kindness, talent and smile were contagious. His kindred spirit will live forever.”

Born in Himeji, Japan, on Feb. 27, 1939, Takada discovered his love for fashion at an early age and enrolled at Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo in 1958. He eventually moved to Paris in 1965 to

Read More

Sparkle, dance and postal service infuse Paris Fashion Week

Video: The best fall fashion trends for 2020 (Global News)

The best fall fashion trends for 2020

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

PARIS — From escapism at the disco, to resistance and aggression, even to pondering the importance of the postal service while working from home, designers in Paris have presented divergent creative responses to the global health crisis as spring-summer shows continued Friday.



a statue of a person


© Provided by The Canadian Press


Like Milan before it, Paris is undertaking an unusual fashion season for spring-summer 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

For its nine-day duration, the calendar is flitting between 16 in-person, ready-to-wear runway collections, with masked guests, celebrities and editors in seated rows, around 20 in-person presentations, and several dozen completely digital shows streamed online with promotional videos.

Some of the show’s highlights:

ISSEY MIYAKE’S POST

The starting point of the latest collection from the Japanese house famed for its techo-fabrics

Read More

10 Latina Fashion Editors Share the Brands They’re Excited About Right Now

Refinery29

Here’s What It Takes For Fashion Brands To Be Sustainable. Can The Industry Be Saved?

It’s time to wake up. On Global Day of Climate Action, VICE Media Group is solely telling stories about our current climate crisis. Click here to meet young climate leaders from around the globe and learn how you can take action. By now, the fashion industry’s harmful effects on the environment are well-known. With natural resources being used faster than they can be renewed, and more clothing produced by brands (and thrown out by consumers) than ever before, the environmental impact of the industry, as it currently operates, is catastrophic. “In the U.S., 11 million tons of textiles go into landfills every year,” says Kristy Caylor, CEO and co-founder of For Days, a zero-waste, organic line of basics. “When these clothes decompose, they release methane which is more harmful than CO2.” With this in

Read More